Publication Date

1990

Abstract

[Excerpt] Imagine a man driving down a street that he has driven everyday for the past 10 years. In the years that he has driven on this street, it has always been one-way. Over time, this driver has become so familiar with this street that he no longer looks out the windshield at the road, but drives while looking in the rear view mirror. At first, looking in the rear view mirror was just an interesting way of driving for this man. More recently however, since he had never been in an accident while driving by looking in the rear view mirror, he has come to believe that this is a safe and effective manner of driving. Now imagine that, unbeknownst to this man, the street has become, for the first time today, a two-way street. Since the man does not know of the change, he is driving on the road as if it is still one-way and he continues to look exclusively in the rear view mirror to navigate. He sees in his rear view mirror cars swerving as they pass. He can see the drivers of these other cars swearing at him. He wonders what has gotten into these people; why are they going the wrong way? Why are they acting so angry with him? He has not done anything wrong. He has been a model driver for 10 years. What is wrong with these crazy people? He thinks they are going to get him into an accident. He begins to panic. He grips the steering wheel and desperately scans the scene in the rear view mirror, trying to avoid an accident. As he scans the road he notices that some other cars (though not the regulars on this route) are going the same way as always. This, he thinks, proves that the drivers going the other way are wrong.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© SAGE. Final version published as: Lindsay, C., & Enz, C. (1990). Blind spots, the rear view mirror, and a road map for cultural diversity. Journal of Management Education, 14(1), 54-61. doi: 10.1177/105256298901400107

Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

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