Publication Date

2009

Abstract

This study examines individual differences in self-attributed motives for tipping. The findings indicate that: (i) individual differences in various intrinsic motives load on one factor while individual differences in various self-presentational motives load on another factor, (ii) more people claim to tip for intrinsic reasons than for self-presentational reasons, (iii) the self-attributed motives for tipping appear to be largely similar across demographic lines, (iv) individual differences in self-attributed motives for tipping are rooted in more general dispositional tendencies toward conformity and feelings of gratitude, and (v) intrinsic motives for tipping are associated with larger restaurant percentage tips and greater likelihood of nonrestaurant tipping, and (vi) self-presentational motives for tipping are associated with smaller restaurant percentage tips. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed along with directions for future research.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© Elsevier. Final version published as: Lynn, M. (2009). Individual differences in self-attributed motives for tipping: Antecedents, consequences, and implications. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 28(3), 432-438. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

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